writers tips / writing

Writers Tip #68: Three Tips From David Shenk

writers tips

Great tips for soon-to-be great writers

When you read your story, does it sound off, maybe you can’t quite put your finger on it, but you know you’ve done something wrong? Sometimes–maybe even lots of times–there are simple fixes. These writer’s tips will come at you once a week, giving you plenty of time to go through your story and make the adjustments.

Today’s tips come from David Shenk, non-fiction author of The Forgetting and The Genius in All of Us. If you’re a non-fic writer like I am, you’ll enjoy the lecture David Shenk gave at Brown University, November 11 2009, called “The Art of Nonfiction“. For all my fiction friends out there–and for myself as I struggle to finish my thriller by the end of summer–you’ll find these three tips critical. Good writing crosses all lines.

Enjoy!

  1. Make it great, no matter how long it takes. There’s no such thing as too many drafts. There’s no such thing as too much time spent. As you well know, a great book can last forever. A great book can change a person’s life. A mediocre book is just commerce.
  2. Get feedback — oodles of it. Along the way, show pieces of your book to lots of people — different types of people. Ply them with wine and beg them for candor. Find out what’s missing, what’s being misinterpreted, what isn’t convincing, what’s falling flat. This doesn’t mean you take every suggestion or write the book by committee. But this process will allow to marry your necessarily-precious vision with how people will actually react. I find that invaluable.
  3. Let some of you come through. You’re obviously not writing a memoir here, but this book is still partly about you — the world you see, the way you think, the experiences you have with people. And trust me, readers are interested in who you are. So don’t be afraid to let bits and pieces of your personality and even life details seep into the text. It will breathe a lot of life into the book.

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Jacqui Murray is the editor of a technology curriculum for K-fifth grade and creator of two technology training books for middle school. She is the author of Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy midshipman.  She is webmaster for five blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, a columnist for Examiner.com, and a weekly contributor to Write Anything and Technology in Education. Currently, she’s working on a techno-thriller that should be ready this summer. Contact Jacqui at her writing office or her tech lab, Ask a Tech Teacher.

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4 thoughts on “Writers Tip #68: Three Tips From David Shenk

  1. I’ve had that happen to me. I’ve learned to ignore a lot. There are those times when fresh eyes uncover something so obvious I can’t believe I missed it. Then I am so thankful.

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  2. Excellent points Jacqui… though I’m not sure I’d want to share my book with oodles of people who might end up giving me conflicting or endless negativity… A few trusted yet brutally honest souls would be my preference. You catch my drift.
    Thank you for the tips… I love getting them. 🙂

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