Genre tips

Today’s #AtoZChallenge Topic: Grant Proposals

A to Z Challenge asks bloggers to post every day except Sundays during the month of April on a thematic topic. This year, I’ll be covering writing genres.

Today’s genre:

atoz-gGrant Proposals

Definition

A formal proposal submitted to a government or civilian entity that outlines a proposed project, shows budgetary requirements, and requests monetary assistance in the form of a grant. The format of grant writing varies significantly from any other form of writing.

Tipsa to z

  1. Begin early.
  2. Apply early and often.
  3. Don’t forget to include a cover letter with your application.
  4. Answer all questions. (Pre-empt all unstated questions.)
  5. If rejected, revise your proposal and apply again.
  6. Give them what they want. Follow the application guidelines exactly.
  7. Be explicit and specific.
  8. Be realistic in designing the project.
  9. Make explicit the connections between your research questions and objectives, your objectives and methods, your methods and results, and your results and dissemination plan.
  10. Follow the application guidelines exactly. (I repeat this tip because it is very, very important.)

Click for complete list of genres


Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, and the thriller, To Hunt a Sub. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer,  a columnist for TeachHUB, monthly contributor to Today’s Author and a freelance journalist on tech ed topics. You can find her books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning. The sequel to To Hunt a Sub, Twenty-four Days, is scheduled for May 2017. Click to follow its progress.

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41 thoughts on “Today’s #AtoZChallenge Topic: Grant Proposals

    • I’m so glad you added this comment. I bet you’re one of those who appreciates grant writing. Truly, if you don’t do it right, I think you don’t have access to those ‘amazing grants’.

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    • Not my writing genre either, but I know people who love it–it’s their job and they’re great at it. Since I write a lot of non-fiction, I get the evidence-based argument. It’s all the rules that defeat me.

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    • Thanks! When I started writing, I just wrote, but that’s too novice. It’s important to understand the requirements of each genre. For example, who would write a grant in a freeform application? Hmm…

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  1. I think when it comes to granted and proposed the language used for the consent is important right? Not too complex but formal at the same time.

    Good luck for the release of the sender to your book

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi! Interesting – I can’t imagine ever having to apply for a grant. I suppose I should learn more about them before making statements like that, though. 🙂 I’m going to stumble through your blog. Have a lovely day!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My side of the globe, I wonder what’s the situation with writing grants?
    I’m thinking that a writing grant given for a book, would have to be in line with our Department Of Education book/literary needs and shortages…but I could be totally off the mark…just thinking out loud here… 😃

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My day job is managing grants for a major medical device company. I wish my applicants could all see this post; half of them fail to follow the simple instructions that come with the packet, which means I spend a lot of time babysitting – because our committee has decided not to automatically reject applications that are incomplete, come in under the minimum time frame cited, etc. You would think something as simple as a *signature* would be a no-brainer … but that’s the most frequent thing I go back for.

    Sharon E. Cathcart
    Award-winning Author of Fiction Featuring Atypical Characters
    #atozchallenge

    Liked by 1 person

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