writers / writing

#IWSG–What would I change if I could

writers groupThis post is for Alex Cavanaugh’s Insecure Writers Support Group (click the link for details on what that means and how to join. You will also find a list of bloggers signed up to the challenge that are worth checking out. The first Wednesday of every month, we all post our thoughts, fears or words of encouragement for fellow writers.

This month’s insecurity – As you look back on 2017, with all its successes/failures, if you could backtrack, what would you do differently?

I have to say, I’m not the type to dwell on my past. There are a few things I wish I hadn’t done decades ago–nothing to do with writing–but these events did help me grow into the person I am now. I apologize when I make a mistake, fix problems I create or run into, but I really don’t stress over my mistakes. I credit that attitude (yep, I’m happy to not look back with regret) on my supremely supportive circle of friends and family. They seem to love and support me no matter my mistakes.

I’m interested to see what everyone else writes!

More IWSG articles:

None of My Marketing Seems to Work

Beta Reader? Or not?

Should I use my first name or an initial?


Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, the Rowe-Delamagente thrillers, and the upcoming Born in a Treacherous Time. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer,  a columnist for TeachHUB, monthly contributor to Today’s Author and a freelance journalist on tech ed topics. You can find her books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning.

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72 thoughts on “#IWSG–What would I change if I could

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  4. I like to reflect on the past to find meaning and areas for personal growth. I see life as a journey and the downs make the ups that much more rewarding. I like your philosophy and approach. Agreed, connection and support is what helps us transcend challenges—even when the challenge is ourself. Wishing you a very Merry Christmas and another amazing year!!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Jacqui – we certainly can’t back-track … too many other wheels would fall off – we just need to try and make sure wheels stay on the track where we want them in 2018 .. so here’s to that thought – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    • So well said. I just read your post on ‘toxic people’. I ended up thinking back on whether I let them in my life too long, should have cut them out sooner. But, no–I’m sure I learned from exactly the time I spent coping with them.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I like your attitude, Jacqui! Although I’ve made plenty of mistakes in the past, there is no dwelling on them. Fix them and move on. I wouldn’t go back and truly change anything in my past, because then I wouldn’t be where I am. And I’m very grateful for where I am in life. Wishing you and your loved ones Happy Holidays and happy writing in December!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m with you, Jacqui. There’s no point in having regrets because you cannot do anything about them. I believe there’s a reason for everything that happens in life even though I may not know what the reason is.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I don’t feel I’ve much time to look back!! Struggling to look forward at times as it seems to come so quickly. Even if there have been some decisions I’ve regretted things worked out for the better anyway…life is odd like that! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I try only to look back to learn and move on, especially if I keep repeating it lol. Otherwise one day at time and plan for a future -let it go – let it be and live life while I can. Every action and decision no matter how small or big is a risk and an opportunity in the layout of cause and effect as time stops for no one. If looking back does teach you, make better or add to your growth or edification it benefits you and all you contact but if not, eyes forward and moving. Tis life. Go with the flow. Onward!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I’m not sure I’d change anything. While I’ve made decisions in years past that were bad and led to painful consequences… those are part of what’s shaped me into who I am today. My failures, mistakes, triumphs, and trials are all important. I try to live by Mya Angelou’s words “when you know better, you do better.” You’ve got to fall and make mistakes sometimes, that’s how you learn!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is a good wish, Jill. Life sounds endless but it’s actually fairly short. ‘Slowing down’ probably means focusing on certain tasks that you haven’t taken time to do. I have found it quite therapeutic to simply stare at nature.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I think the freedom to make choices, and mistakes, is a boon. While there are lots of things I could have done differently, I do recognise that none of those other choices had any more or less chances of success or failure compared to the one I chose. That was true then. It is true now. Even though I am, perhaps, wiser now, I have no formula to predict the future. Hence, I try to focus on controllables and make choices that I am comfortable with.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well said, Ankur. That freedom to make a choice–good or bad–is priceless. I’m sad when we try to overprotect people against that choice for fear it won’t work. I’m with you, as I look back on a lifetime of choices.

      Liked by 1 person

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