Genre tips

Today’s #AtoZChallenge: Genres–Juvenile

The A to Z Challenge asks bloggers to post every day except Sundays during the month of April on a thematic topic. This year, my second year with A to Z, I’ll cover writing genres.

Today’s genre:

Juvenile

Definition

Juvenile: novels, stories, poetry, and various non-fiction written for adolescents between 13-18

Tipsa to z

  1. The subject matter must pertain to issues teens might have to deal with.
  2. Length is often 40-80,000 words.
  3. Feature a teen protagonist with a teen sort of problem–parents, school, boyfriend, or another.
  4. Remember: Teens have raging hormones and incomplete brains/thought processes.
  5. Lots of books in this genre are told in first person, present tense.
  6. Pacing should be fast and voice chatty.

Popular Books

  1. Ballet for Martha: Making Appalachian Spring by Jan Greenberg
  2. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  3. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  4. Goosebumps by R.L. Stine
  5. Holes by Louis Sachar
  6. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
  7. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
  8. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  9. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
  10. A Separate Peace by John Knowles

Click for complete list of  2018 A to Z genres

More J Genres:

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Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, the Rowe-Delamagente thrillers, and the upcoming Born in a Treacherous Time. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer,  a columnist for TeachHUB, monthly contributor to Today’s Author and a freelance journalist on tech ed topics. You can find her books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning.

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48 thoughts on “Today’s #AtoZChallenge: Genres–Juvenile

  1. Jacqui, I’ve enjoyed nearly all of the books you listed; many of them are among my all-time favorites. Must include a few other titles: The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings; the five books of Madeleine L’Engle’s Wrinkle in Time series; Roald Dahl’s books, especially Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and James and the Giant Peach; Katherine Paterson’s The Bridge to Terebithia, and Jacob Have I Loved; all books by Jerry Spinelli, Judy Blume, and Louis Sachar, and many by Mark Twain. These books continue to engage and inspire young people decades after they were written.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s that purposeful immaturity that keeps me away. I want to shake them (virtually)!.

      BTW, when I click on your gravatar, it doesn’t take me to your blog. Thanks for add the link to the comment!

      Like

  2. Отправлено из Почта для Windows 10

    От: WordDreams… Отправлено: 11 апреля 2018 г. в 9:58 Кому: gnomix137@gmail.com Тема: [New post] Today’s #AtoZChallenge: Genres–Juvenile

    Jacqui Murray posted: “The A to Z Challenge asks bloggers to post every day except Sundays during the month of April on a thematic topic. This year, my second year with A to Z, I’ll cover writing genres. Today’s genre: Juvenile Definition Juvenile: novels, stories, poetry”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Have always enjoyed juvenile – I think also called young adult (?) – especially an Australian series by John Marsden. When the War Began I think was the first in the series. Would love to write for that age group – one tough audience though.

    Liked by 2 people

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