book reviews

2 Romance Novels I LOVED

Here are two great romance novels I loved:

  1. Maggie’s Revenge — a dedicated FBI agent will stop at nothing to rescue victims of sex trafficking
  2. April in Galway — April’s perfect; Billy isn’t but that doesn’t stop him from approaching her

That I loved a romance novel means a lot because I don’t usually pick up this genre.

A note about my reviews: I only post reviews about books I liked so don’t be surprised to see lots of 4/5 and 5/5. If I don’t like the book, I won’t spend time writing about it.


jacquie biggarMaggie’s Revenge

by Jacquie Biggar

5/5

In Jacquie Biggar’s Maggie’s Revenge (Wavefront Publishing 2017), #6 in the Wounded Heart series, Agent Magdalena Holt goes undercover to penetrate a child and female trafficking cartel but something goes horribly wrong and she disappears. For a year, her partner Adam doesn’t know whether she’s alive or dead except occasionally when groups of women are rescued just in time to save them from being sold into the sex industry. When they see Maggie’s picture, they credit her with the rescue. Finally, after endless abuse, physical and psychological injuries, and mind-numbing treatment, Maggie contacts her partner to come get her and a carful of women who have escaped a cartel stronghold and are now somewhere in the Mexican desert. But they’re not alone. Or won’t be for long. Their captors are searching for them. Her partner Adam, a former SEAL, brings another SEAL buddy, Frank, his best friend and like Adam, in love with Maggie, and his FBI boss. The rescue doesn’t quite work as planned but Maggie is tough, resilient, and clever. No matter the odds, she won’t give up. Ever.

I really enjoyed this book. While it focuses on the damage cartels do to families, the horror inflicted on women and children, and the inadequate effort made to stop them, it also highlights the tireless steps some dedicated people will take to stop the abuse. Recommended for anyone who enjoys a fast-paced meaningful read.


April in Galway

by Martha  Reynolds

5/5

In Martha Reynolds latest novel, April in Galway (2019), Billy Flanagan has a simple goal: to ask the woman he wanted to marry thirty years ago if she’s forgotten him. Because he hasn’t forgotten her. An opportunity presents itself when he finds out she (April Tweed) will be in Galway Ireland shooting a movie and he can get time off his teaching job to fly there from America. Around this simple very human goal, Reynolds builds a cartload of drama, all doled out a tiny bit at a time as treachery, promises broken, and lives lived on hold. For example. Billy has gained 30 pounds, lost a lot of hair, been through multiple divorces, and almost lost his battle with alcoholism. April, though, through Billy’s rose-colored glasses, remains perfect. What Billy does to achieve his dream will have you rooting for him every step of the way.

This is a delightful read, highly recommended to romantics in general and romance readers specifically.

View all my reviews

More about romance novels

3 Great Romantic Reads

8 Tips for Romance Writers

Book Review: An Affair of Deceit


Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, the Rowe-Delamagente thrillers, and the Man vs. Nature saga. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, blog webmaster, an Amazon Vine Voice,  a columnist for TeachHUB and NEA Today, and a freelance journalist on tech ed topics. Look for her next prehistoric fiction, The Quest for Home, Fall 2019. You can find her tech ed books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning

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51 thoughts on “2 Romance Novels I LOVED

  1. You can write when you want to put your study into practice. I have read so much about love but i had no opportunity to undergo it’s practical again since my wife died.
    i need a good woman to share the real love together.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You prove in your reviews here what I’ve always said. The “romance” genre is given a bum rap, in which potential readers think it means “bodice rippers.” But no, real themes and ideas and values are written within a (good) romance novel, as you show here. Also, romance novels are not easy to write, yet so many writers discount them.
    There, I feel better. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I appreciate you sharing that. At first, I thought people would not take my reviews seriously because they’re always 4/5 or 5/5 but I find there are quite a few of us who feel the same way–why waste writing about books we don’t like?

      Like

  3. Great reviews. Thanks for sharing. I especially like the idea of a story bringing awareness to readers–in this case about human trafficking, an epidemic in this world. I like romance novels to include mystery, paranormal. Mix it up, I say. These sound good for a summer read.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jacqui, thank you! I’ve never considered myself a romance novelist (opting for a satisfactory ending rather than a traditional happily ever after). But I was so pleased with the way this story ended that I immediately began my next novel picking up where this one ends. And I’m combining it with a novel I wrote four years ago, so the new novel is kind of a sequel to two separate books. Onward! Again, thank you. ♥️

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I must admit I’m not a big fan of romance novels but I like the sound of the first one given the action involved. I find it takes a talented author to blend the action/thriller/mystery genres with romance without dampening the appeal or making it seem too sickly sweet and at odds with the base premise. x

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Jacqui, thank you for the wonderful review! This book took a long time to write. After Maggie was captured in a previous story (The Rebel’s Redemption- free today!) I wasn’t sure how to proceed without going too deep into the horridness that is human trafficking. I hope I reached a comfortable compromise, while still doing justice to the subject.
    The numbers of women and children who go missing are simply staggering. We need some better methods to hunt these monsters down.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Maggie’s Revenge sounds like an excellent story as it addresses a topic that’s sadly underground but always present. Sex trafficking exploits the most vulnerable in society and they have no voice – good for Jacquie Biggar that she gives them a spotlight.
    April in Galway addresses enduring romance from the perspective of an aging population. Still dreaming, still loving, still yearning, Martha Reynolds’ story sounds like a great read.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Interesting reviews, Jacqui. The second sounds quite fun and humorous. The first doesn’t really sound like a romance to me. What a tragic and horrific situation for too many.

    Liked by 2 people

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