The Quest for Home

The Quest for Home (Book 2 of Crossroads trilogy)

Driven from her home. Stalked by enemies. Now her closest ally may be a traitor.

Xhosa flees what she had hoped would be her new home after being attacked by invaders from the North. She leads her People on a grueling journey through unknown and dangerous lands of what we now call Europe. As she struggles to overcome strangers around her and disruptions within her People, Xhosa faces the reality that her most dangerous enemy may not be the one she expected. It may be one she has trusted with her life.

The story is set 850,000 years ago, a time in prehistory when man populated most of Eurasia. He was a violent species, fully capable of addressing the many hardships that threatened his survival except for one: future man, a smarter version of himself, one destined to obliterate any who came before.

Based on a true story, this is an unforgettable saga of hardship and determination, conflict and passion as early man spreads across Eurasia. Xhosa must regularly does the impossible which is good because nothing less than the future of mankind is at stake.

Purchase: Amazon


Book information:

Title and author: The Quest for Home, Book 2 of Crossroads Trilogy, part of the Man vs. Nature saga, by Jacqui Murray

ISBN: 978-1-942101-41-3

Release Date: September 2019 by Structured Learning

Genre: Prehistoric fiction

Available on Amazon


About the Author:

Jacqui Murray is the author of the popular Building a Midshipman, the story of her daughter’s journey from high school to United States Naval Academy, the Rowe-Delamagente thrillers, and the Man vs. Nature saga. She is also the author/editor of over a hundred books on integrating tech into education, adjunct professor of technology in education, an Amazon Vine Voice,  and a columnist for NEA Today. Look for her next prehistoric fiction, In the Footsteps of Giants Winter 2020. You can find her tech ed books at her publisher’s website, Structured Learning

What readers say about Murray’s fiction:

This book grabbed my attention from the first chapter, actually the first paragraph. The intrigue is great and even though I have no idea what all the computer-based information is about, it does not detract from my ability to follow and really enjoy the book, because the author is able to incorporate that information in the writing, without overloading the reader. Hope there will be a sequel to this. Finally, despite my desire not to lay the book down (or Kindle in this case), I do have things I must do but am able to easily pick back up and continue reading without have to backtrack. That is the quality of a good book!!


Lots of action, suspense, and twists


J Murray’s long-anticipated thriller, To Hunt a Sub, is a satisfying read from a fresh voice in the genre, and well worth the wait. The time devoted to research paid off, providing a much-appreciated authenticity to the sciency aspects of the plot. The author also departs from the formulaic pacing and heroics of contemporary commercialized thrillers. Instead, the moderately paced narrative is a seduction, rather than a sledgehammer. The author takes time rendering relatable characters with imaginatively cool names like Zeke Rowe, and Kalian Delamagente. The scenes are vividly depicted, and the plot not only contains exquisitely treacherous twists and turns, but incorporates the fascinating study of early hominids, and one ancestral female in particular who becomes an essential character. The narrative might have benefited from language with a crispier, sharper edge, but that is purely my personal taste and preference, and takes nothing away from the over-all satisfaction of this novel.


Timely. I haven’t heard of a highjacked submarine, but the blueprint in this book could work!


A nuclear sub goes missing and Zeke Rowe is called in to help with the investigation. He joins forces with Kali Delamagente, the developer of an AI named Otto whose unique ability is compiling clues and finding things – like ancient people, kidnappers, and modern subs. Rowe’s not the only one whose interested in the subs or Otto’s capabilities. Bent on destroying America, a terrorist is making Kali’s life miserable, breaking into her lab, hacking her computer, and making hostages out of those she loves. As the terrorist ring closes in, time is running out and the stakes are rising.

One thing I enjoyed about this read is the technical reality Murray created for both the scientific and military aspects of the book. I completely believed the naval and investigatory hierarchy and protocols, as well as the operation inside the sub. I was fascinated by her explanation of Otto’s capabilities, the security efforts Kali employs to protect her data, and how she used Otto’s data to help Rowe.

If that all sounds like too much science, the characters are also well-rounded human beings with colorful histories and rich emotional palettes. There’s a little romantic attraction thrown in for fun though it isn’t a main focus of the story. The plot is high energy and complex with twists that require the reader to pay attention. To Hunt a Sub is an entertaining novel for anyone who enjoys military thrillers.


Can’t wait for the sequel!